FODMAPs: Could common foods be harming your digestive health?

watermelon

Functional gut disorders such as IBS are affecting one in five Americans, causing abdominal pain, inconsistent or excessive bowel movements, and even psychological symptoms such as anxiety or depression.

 If you have experienced IBS, you know that these symptoms can be constant, painful, and can have a serious impact on quality of life.

If there were a dietary intervention that could reduce or eliminate IBS symptoms, would you try it? Tweet This

There is a strategy that has recently become more popular; it is a dietary approach that I have seen work well for many of my patients, and that evidence is growing in support of. Known as the Low FODMAP Diet, this method has been demonstrated to reduce functional gut disorder symptoms in approximately 75% of patients. (2) Understanding how FODMAPs affect the gut and knowing how to eliminate them from your diet may be the key to getting your IBS symptoms under control.

What are FODMAPs?

The acronym FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols. These short-chain carbohydrates are incompletely absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and can be easily fermented by gut bacteria. (3) These sugars also exert an osmotic effect, increasing fluid movement into the large bowel. (4) The fermentation and osmosis caused by these undigested sugars are a cause of major IBS symptoms such as gas, pain, and diarrhea.

There are many common foods that are high in FODMAPs that can potentially contribute to IBS symptoms, even if they are considered healthy by most standards. Lactose from dairy products, fructose from certain fruit, coconut products, and sweeteners, fructans from fibrous vegetables, and polyols from fruit and sugar alcohols are all rich in FODMAPs and can be difficult to digest for people with functional gut disorders. These foods can cause serious and painful symptoms in those with IBS and Crohn’s disease.

Who may have FODMAP intolerance?

While most IBS patients are FODMAP intolerant, consuming FODMAPs does not actually cause IBS; it simply exacerbates symptoms. (5) Therefore, while many people may be able to consume a large quantity of FODMAPs with no problem, some people will experience an abnormal or exaggerated response to the presence of these poorly absorbed saccharides. (6) And while all FODMAPs can potentially factor in the development of IBS symptoms, the relative contribution of different types of FODMAPs varies across ethnic and dietary groups depending on the amount of each in the diet. (7) Additionally, individuals differ in their amount of malabsorption of FODMAPs such as fructose, lactose, and fructans, and therefore are more or less sensitive to certain FODMAPs in particular.

So what causes FODMAP intolerance? There are a few possible explanations that have been explored in clinical study. In some cases, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, also known as SIBO, contributes to the development of IBS symptoms and FODMAP intolerance. (8) The presence of pathogenic bacteria in the small intestine causes excessive fermentation of these carbohydrates, increasing gas production and allowing for the proliferation of uncontrolled gut bacteria. In other cases, certain individuals may lack adequate enzymes to break down and absorb the fermentable sugars before they reach the colon, contributing to the osmolarity changes and bacterial fermentation that occurs in the large intestine.

Of course, emotional and physical stress are also known to be contributing factors to the development of IBS, and could induce FODMAP intolerance for reasons not yet fully understood. (9) In these cases, disturbance of gut microbiota is a likely causative factor; as we know, stress alters the gut flora significantly and could be the reason why stress, FODMAP intolerance, and IBS are so closely linked.

How can you treat FODMAP intolerance?

First, addressing intestinal bacterial overgrowth or imbalance is key; even if you don’t have IBS, gut dysbiosis can lead to poor digestive function as well as contributing to FODMAP intolerance. There are a few gut-healing protocols available today, such as the GAPS Diet or the Specific Carbohydrate Diet; my personal approach is similar to an autoimmune Paleo diet. I often recommend probiotics to my patients to help balance out their gut flora, and occasionally recommend antimicrobial treatments depending on the severity of the individual gut infection. Managing gut flora is a highly individual process, so it’s important to pay attention to your own symptoms when coming up with a treatment plan.

In addition to addressing gut bacteria, following a low FODMAP diet seems to be the most effective dietary intervention to help reduce chronic IBS symptoms. (10) Many clinical trials have shown a high level of success from IBS patients who reduce or eliminate FODMAP containing foods from their diet. (111213) In addition, avoiding gluten may help reduce IBS symptoms further, according to some research. (14)

While a “Paleo” or “Primal” diet may eliminate many of these culprits, there are a few Paleo-friendly staples that can worsen FODMAP intolerance symptoms. I’ve written about coconut milk causing digestive distress in some individuals, and coconut milk is an unfortunately high source of FODMAPs. Many fruits such as apples, peaches, mangoes, and watermelon are FODMAP rich, and dried fruits are especially problematic for those with intolerances. Even certain vegetables that are normally quite healthy can be problematic for those suffering from IBS; asparagus, brussels sprouts, broccoli, garlic, and onions are just a few of the vegetables that could be exacerbating symptoms.

To determine which specific foods that may be causing your IBS symptoms, I recommend reviewing this basic but informative chart featuring different types of FODMAPs and the foods they are found in. You may be consuming a FODMAP-rich food without knowing it, and reducing or eliminating consumption of these foods may help alleviate IBS symptoms. This chart also provides a list of low FODMAP foods that can be enjoyed in place of these problematic foods.

For much more information about FODMAP intolerance, as well as an extensive list of FODMAP foods and an in-depth gut healing protocol, check out my Personal Paleo Code. In this detailed guide, I explain how to best adapt the standard Paleo diet into one that can help relieve IBS symptoms without needing to restrict your diet indefinitely. It’s a protocol I use with my patients, and many have found success without drugs or surgical intervention. It’s certainly worth a try for anyone suffering from chronic digestive disorders.

Original Article Here:

JULY 13, 2012

https://chriskresser.com/fodmaps-could-common-foods-be-harming-your-digestive-health/

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Spring Detox

There are several nutrient-dense superfoods and targeted detox supplements, that should be incorporated into your diet so you can cleanse and remove toxins-safely and naturally.
Seaweed
If you want to support detoxification and overall health-eat your seaweed! Sea vegetables have been part of Asian cuisines for thousands of years and offer remarkable health benefits.
Seaweed contains calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron along with vitamins A, C, E and the B complex. Seaweed also contains compounds that support the removal of toxins, blood sugar stabilization and immunity support. You can choose from a variety of options including nori, kelp, dulse and arame.
Mushrooms
Mushrooms; some people love them, others, not so much. But there are several reasons you should eat your mushrooms. Many culinary mushrooms are rich in antioxidants and compounds that help boost immunity, detoxify the body, reduce inflammation and even repair damaged tissue. Shitake, oyster and maitake are excellent examples. You can include them in soups, sautés and other savory dishes to reap their benefits!
Lemons
When life gives you lemons-detox! Lemon helps the body remove toxins, which is why so many detox plans include lemons. In particular, lemons are an excellent tonic for both the liver and gall bladder.
Cilantro
This common herb has some secret superpowers that are attracting the attention of researchers and medical professionals. It actually helps pull mercury and other toxic metals from organs and tissues, allowing these toxins to attach to binding agents like PectaSol-C Modified Citrus Pectin, for safe elimination through the urinary and GI tract. Cilantro also offers support for other areas of health like immunity.
Artichokes
Artichokes-a favorite blossoming vegetable! But did you know that artichokes support detox? Artichokes naturally increase bile production, which helps your body metabolize and remove toxins and wastes efficiently.
And finally, take your supplements!
To experience full detox benefits, it’s critical to supplement these superfoods with herbs and botanicals that actively detoxify the body, support antioxidant activity and help reduce any possible detox reactions during a cleanse.*
ecoNugenics offers clinically researched detox supplements that safely remove toxins and support long-term health and wellness.
This particular toxin cleanse contains PectaSol-C® Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) combined with alginates derived from kelp. This unique formula is clinically shown to help remove heavy metals, such as lead, mercury and arsenic, and environmental toxins, without removing essential minerals, offering gentle yet highly effective solution to toxic body burden.*
Our total-body detox formula, ecoDetox, helps pull toxins from organs and tissues, enhances the body’s innate detox capacities, and provides critical antioxidant and vital energy support during a cleanse. It contains sulfured amino acids and other detox-supporting nutrients, combined with cilantro, milk thistle, dandelion and specific Chinese herbal blends. ecoDetox can be used alone, or together with PectaClear for more thorough removal of heavy metals and toxins from the body.*
The body is exposed to toxins daily, and this includes countless untested chemicals. There are many mechanisms to get rid of toxins, but a gentle seasonal cleanse is an excellent way to support the elimination processes, enhance immunity and maintain overall health. Whether the cleanse is for three days, three weeks or longer, a spring cleanse can help you maintain a greater level of health and wellness. Through incorporating these and other wholesome foods and supplements into a natural cleanse program, you can nourish your system and eliminate toxins, clearing the way for optimal health throughout the year.
Posted in health | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Your Fountain of Health – Spring Cleaning Sale

It’s that time of year again!

The Radical Remedies Spring Cleaning Sale

fountain-of-health-radical-remedies copy

Save 20%  on Colon Hydrotherapy Services

Call Jillian at 774-487-7092 to book your appointment

Mention “Spring Cleaning Sale” & cultivate your fountain of health!

Spring Cleaning Offer valid through April 1st.

Posted in colon hydrotherapy services, colonics, health, sale | Tagged , , , , , ,

Overdiagnosis and Overtreatment in Cancer

An Opportunity for Improvement

Over the past 30 years, awareness and screening have led to an emphasis on early diagnosis of cancer. Although the goals of these efforts were to reduce the rate of late-stage disease and decrease cancer mortality, secular trends and clinical trials suggest that these goals have not been met; national data demonstrate significant increases in early-stage disease, without a proportional decline in later-stage disease. What has emerged has been an appreciation of the complexity of the pathologic condition called cancer. The word “cancer” often invokes the specter of an inexorably lethal process; however, cancers are heterogeneous and can follow multiple paths, not all of which progress to metastases and death, and include indolent disease that causes no harm during the patient’s lifetime. Better biology alone can explain better outcomes. Although this complexity complicates the goal of early diagnosis, its recognition provides an opportunity to adapt cancer screening with a focus on identifying and treating those conditions most likely associated with morbidity and mortality.

FULL ARTICLE HERE

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gut bacteria May Play a Role in Alzheimer’s Disease

New research from Lund University in Sweden has shown that intestinal bacteria can accelerate the development of Alzheimer’s disease. According to the researchers behind the study, the results open up the door to new opportunities for preventing and treating the disease.

Because our gut bacteria have a major impact on how we feel through the interaction between the immune system, the intestinal mucosa and our diet, the composition of the gut microbiota is of great interest to research on diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Exactly how our gut microbiota composition is composed depends on which bacteria we receive at birth, our genes and our diet.

By studying both healthy and diseased mice, the researchers found that mice suffering from Alzheimer’s have a different composition of gut bacteria compared to mice that are healthy. The researchers also studied Alzheimer’s disease in mice that completely lacked bacteria to further test the relationship between intestinal bacteria and the disease. Mice without bacteria had a significantly smaller amount of beta-amyloid plaque in the brain. Beta-amyloid plaques are the lumps that form at the nerve fibres in cases of Alzheimer’s disease.

To clarify the link between intestinal flora and the occurrence of the disease, the researchers transferred intestinal bacteria from diseased mice to germ-free mice, and discovered that the mice developed more beta-amyloid plaques in the brain compared to if they had received bacteria from healthy mice.

“Our study is unique as it shows a direct causal link between gut bacteria and Alzheimer’s disease. It was striking that the mice which completely lacked bacteria developed much less plaque in the brain,” says researcher Frida Fåk Hållenius, at the Food for Health Science Centre.

“The results mean that we can now begin researching ways to prevent the disease and delay the onset. We consider this to be a major breakthrough as we used to only be able to give symptom-relieving antiretroviral drugs.”

The research is a result of an international collaboration between Associate Professor Frida Fåk Hållenius and doctoral student Nittaya Marungruang, both at the Food for Health Science Centre in Lund, and a research group at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland. The collaboration has now expanded to include researchers from Germany and Belgium in connection with receiving a SEK 50 million EU grant.

The researchers will continue to study the role of bacteria in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and test entirely new types of preventive and therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of the gut microbiota through diet and new types of probiotics.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Lund University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. T. Harach, N. Marungruang, N. Duthilleul, V. Cheatham, K. D. Mc Coy, G. Frisoni, J. J. Neher, F. Fåk, M. Jucker, T. Lasser, T. Bolmont. Reduction of Abeta amyloid pathology in APPPS1 transgenic mice in the absence of gut microbiota. Scientific Reports, 2017; 7: 41802 DOI: 10.1038/srep41802
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

#AdvancedPottyTraining

Our poop and pee have superpowers, but for the most part we don’t harness them. Molly Winter faces down our squeamishness and asks us to see what goes down the toilet as a resource, one that can help fight climate change, spur innovation and even save us money.

Read the full story

By Molly Winter
TED

Posted in health | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sarson ka Saag : High Winter Medicinal Foods

Saag.png

This buttery savory recipe puts the ‘Popeye’ right in your spinach! It goes with everything. I substitute crushed fenugreek seed for leaf, and add crushed fennel seed too. You can vary amounts of herbs to taste, and use any hot pepper you like. High winter recommend as daily whole food medicine staple.

Sarson ka Saag 

(Slow Cooker recipe)

Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons grassfed ghee
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 2-inch knob ginger, minced
  • 2 heaping tablespoons or 7 cloves garlic, minced (I used my garlic press)
  • 1-2 Serrano peppers, minced (remove seeds/rib if you don’t like it spicy!)
  • 2 teaspoon salt, adjust to taste
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • ½ teaspoon Kashmiri chili powder (or a little less if using cayenne)
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound (16 ounces) fresh baby spinach (large container), rinsed
  • 1 pound (16 ounces) chopped mustard leaves (stem removed), rinsed
add later:
Instructions
  1. Add 2 tablespoons ghee, onion, ginger, garlic, Serrano pepper, and spices to your crock pot. Set on high for 1 hour.
  2. While that’s cooking, grab a very large pot. Add the mustard and spinach leaves to the large pot – then fill with water (do not put lid on pot!*).
  3. Bring the pot to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Drain leaves and let them cool.
  4. Once cool, place leaves in a blender and blend to your desired consistency (add a little water as needed to help you blend).
  5. Place the blended leaves into your crock pot, reduce heat to low, put lid on and cook for 2 hours.
  6. After 2 hours, add 1 tablespoon ghee, garam masala and pinch of kasoori/fenugreek leaves. Mix well and let this cook for another hour on low.
  7. Serve this saag with a heaping spoonful of ghee on top!
Notes
The reason you don’t want to place a cover on the pot while boiling the greens is because doing so will cause the pretty green color to fade.

This slow cooker saag recipe is incredible. It’s so rich, buttery and delicious that you’ll forget you’re eating vegetables. Seriously. It’s THAT good. This recipe is the real deal. It’s how this popular Indian dish should be made. This isn’t just any saag, it’s Sarson ka Saag.

A little background on this dish – Saag just means pureed greens, so when you order this dish in a restaurant, chances are that it’s slightly different at each place. Some will add kale, broccoli, even brussels sprouts to their saag…

Author: The Brilliant Ashley Thomas

Original  Recipe Here: http://myheartbeets.com/sarson-ka-saag-slow-cooker/

Posted in medicinal foods, recipes | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment